On this topic in AN. The most important finding of this

On this topic in AN. The most important finding of this study of a large sample of severe AN patients is that we did not identify any correlation between the level of depression, anxiety or Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and any measure of current nutritional status at inclusion, even when taking into account potential confounding factors (age and current psychotropic treatment). This is an unexpected result. Scores for the intensity of depression were however related to the presence of psychotropic treatment and in certain cases to age or duration of illness (univariate analysis). Three main hypotheses might explain our results that failed to reveal any correlation between the nutritional status and the psychological symptoms that we measured. First of all, although we studied a large sample, the subjects’ characteristics might have been largely homogeneous in terms of the severity of malnutrition and the reported psychological symptoms, so that we could not identify any relationship between them. Patients were evaluated at admission to inpatient treatment at the most (or one of the most) severe moments in their illness. For example the narrow SD for BMI (mean = 14.43; SD = 1.45) shows the severe malnutrition and the relative homogeneity in the sample. Even the patients that had higher BMI had lost huge amounts of weight (Cf. methods) and thus were all severely malnourished. Consequently there was very little variation in the degree of malnutrition. Despite the fact that levels of depression and anxiety were variable, we were not able to establish any linkminimum lifetime BMI. Only significant results are reported, details can be requested from the authors. AN-BP and AN-R had no significant difference in psychometric scores. Differences in body composition and BMI are shown in table 3. Patients on antidepressants were significantly older than those who were not (22.466.4 K162 web Emixustat (hydrochloride) versus 20.065.9; p = 0.013), they had longer duration of illness (respectively 5.4465.17 versus 3.5364.27; p = 0.015) and they had significantly higher levels of depression measured on both the BDI (respectively 32.49611.15 versus 23.42610.75; p = 0.000) and the HADs (respectively 11.2264.32 versus 8.3664.31; p = 0.000); they had higher levels of anxiety (respectively 14.0163.9 versus 11.7264.40; p = 0.001) obsessive disorders (respectively 13.9165.78 versus 11.7065.68; p = 0.023) and social phobia (respectively 64.17615.35 versus 53.96614.96; p = 0.000). Lower albumin levels were detected for patients on antidepressant treatment than for those without antidepressants (respectively 0.9860.16 versus 1.0460.15; p = 0.035). Compared to patients without anxiolytic treatment patients on anxiolytics had higher levels of depression measured by both the BDI (respectively 29.72611.02 versus 24.95611.83; p = 0.014) and the HADs (respectively 10.7264.34 versus 8.6264.46; p = 0.005). Age was highly correlated to duration of illness in our sample (p = 0.000, r = 0.668) so we adjusted our comparison on age but not on duration of illness. Correlations between age, duration of illness and psychological scores, BMI and body composition are shown in table 4. Minimum lifetime BMI was not correlated to any of the psychological scores.Table 3. Differences and means of BMI and body composition components between AN-R and AN-BP.Mean D AN-R (N = 74) Inclusion BMI (kg/m ) Minimum lifetime BMI (kg/m2) Maximum lifetime BMI (kg/m2) FMI+ FFMI+ AN-R: Anorexia Nervosa Restrictive type. AN-BP: A.On this topic in AN. The most important finding of this study of a large sample of severe AN patients is that we did not identify any correlation between the level of depression, anxiety or Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and any measure of current nutritional status at inclusion, even when taking into account potential confounding factors (age and current psychotropic treatment). This is an unexpected result. Scores for the intensity of depression were however related to the presence of psychotropic treatment and in certain cases to age or duration of illness (univariate analysis). Three main hypotheses might explain our results that failed to reveal any correlation between the nutritional status and the psychological symptoms that we measured. First of all, although we studied a large sample, the subjects’ characteristics might have been largely homogeneous in terms of the severity of malnutrition and the reported psychological symptoms, so that we could not identify any relationship between them. Patients were evaluated at admission to inpatient treatment at the most (or one of the most) severe moments in their illness. For example the narrow SD for BMI (mean = 14.43; SD = 1.45) shows the severe malnutrition and the relative homogeneity in the sample. Even the patients that had higher BMI had lost huge amounts of weight (Cf. methods) and thus were all severely malnourished. Consequently there was very little variation in the degree of malnutrition. Despite the fact that levels of depression and anxiety were variable, we were not able to establish any linkminimum lifetime BMI. Only significant results are reported, details can be requested from the authors. AN-BP and AN-R had no significant difference in psychometric scores. Differences in body composition and BMI are shown in table 3. Patients on antidepressants were significantly older than those who were not (22.466.4 versus 20.065.9; p = 0.013), they had longer duration of illness (respectively 5.4465.17 versus 3.5364.27; p = 0.015) and they had significantly higher levels of depression measured on both the BDI (respectively 32.49611.15 versus 23.42610.75; p = 0.000) and the HADs (respectively 11.2264.32 versus 8.3664.31; p = 0.000); they had higher levels of anxiety (respectively 14.0163.9 versus 11.7264.40; p = 0.001) obsessive disorders (respectively 13.9165.78 versus 11.7065.68; p = 0.023) and social phobia (respectively 64.17615.35 versus 53.96614.96; p = 0.000). Lower albumin levels were detected for patients on antidepressant treatment than for those without antidepressants (respectively 0.9860.16 versus 1.0460.15; p = 0.035). Compared to patients without anxiolytic treatment patients on anxiolytics had higher levels of depression measured by both the BDI (respectively 29.72611.02 versus 24.95611.83; p = 0.014) and the HADs (respectively 10.7264.34 versus 8.6264.46; p = 0.005). Age was highly correlated to duration of illness in our sample (p = 0.000, r = 0.668) so we adjusted our comparison on age but not on duration of illness. Correlations between age, duration of illness and psychological scores, BMI and body composition are shown in table 4. Minimum lifetime BMI was not correlated to any of the psychological scores.Table 3. Differences and means of BMI and body composition components between AN-R and AN-BP.Mean D AN-R (N = 74) Inclusion BMI (kg/m ) Minimum lifetime BMI (kg/m2) Maximum lifetime BMI (kg/m2) FMI+ FFMI+ AN-R: Anorexia Nervosa Restrictive type. AN-BP: A.

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