Ne.0123255 May 12,7 /African Migrant Patients’ Trust in Chinese Physiciansalso frequently recounted

Ne.0123255 May 12,7 /African Migrant Patients’ Trust in Chinese Physiciansalso frequently recounted negative experiences of their friends. One student who was visibly GSK-1605786 molecular weight suffering from an eye infection explained that he preferred to wait until he returned home to have his eye examined. Despite having had a positive encounter with several Chinese physicians during a check-up required for his student visa, his friends’ and classmates’ experiences being misdiagnosed or ill-treated had undermined his trust in Chinese physicians.Health system levelAt the health system level, two primary factors influenced African migrants’ trust in their physicians: the payment system and lack of continuity with any one physician. With the exception of students, most participants reported that they did not have health insurance in China and were forced to pay out of pocket. The majority reported having to pay for care at the time of registration, before seeing the doctor, in contrast to practices in their home countries. For some, this policy led them to question the priorities of their physicians, particularly when this practice differed from payment practices in their home countries. Other participants were more concerned about having to pay separately at each step of the process–for the consultation, diagnostic tests, intravenous drips, and medications–which seemed to emphasize money throughout the encounter. Awareness about the fee-for-service nature of the payment system led some participants to question the motivations of their doctors. A notable example was when they were prescribed what seemed to be an unnecessarily large number of medications. Some believed that the fee-for-service system motivated providers to act against the patient’s interest by encouraging unnecessary prescriptions. Participants also described an inability to make appointments with doctors in China, which prevented continuity of care with any one physician. Instead, those who had returned to the same health facility several times generally reported seeing a different doctor each time. For some, this meant that they were unable to develop a order Vercirnon relationship of trust with a physician over time. Those participants who reported that the lack of physician continuity affected their trust in the physicians contrasted this lack of continuity to their experiences in their countries of origin. One participant explained that he trusted his doctor at home because he grew up receiving care from him. He then explained that there was one doctor in China whom he had seen more than once, and he felt that the care he received improved the more he saw that doctor. Responding to this gap in the system, some participants proactively sought to establish a long-term relationship with a physician with whom they had a positive initial experience. Often this meant learning the physician’s work schedule and only seeking care on days when they were on duty. Since there was no way to formally schedule appointments through the hospital administration, at the end of each visit one participant informally scheduled each subsequent visit directly with her obstetrician. Four participants said they requested the physician’s phone number so that they could call or text ahead of time to make sure the physician would be available or to request informal referrals to other types of specialists if needed.Socio-cultural levelThe broader socio-cultural context in which Africans and Chinese interacted also shaped participants’.Ne.0123255 May 12,7 /African Migrant Patients’ Trust in Chinese Physiciansalso frequently recounted negative experiences of their friends. One student who was visibly suffering from an eye infection explained that he preferred to wait until he returned home to have his eye examined. Despite having had a positive encounter with several Chinese physicians during a check-up required for his student visa, his friends’ and classmates’ experiences being misdiagnosed or ill-treated had undermined his trust in Chinese physicians.Health system levelAt the health system level, two primary factors influenced African migrants’ trust in their physicians: the payment system and lack of continuity with any one physician. With the exception of students, most participants reported that they did not have health insurance in China and were forced to pay out of pocket. The majority reported having to pay for care at the time of registration, before seeing the doctor, in contrast to practices in their home countries. For some, this policy led them to question the priorities of their physicians, particularly when this practice differed from payment practices in their home countries. Other participants were more concerned about having to pay separately at each step of the process–for the consultation, diagnostic tests, intravenous drips, and medications–which seemed to emphasize money throughout the encounter. Awareness about the fee-for-service nature of the payment system led some participants to question the motivations of their doctors. A notable example was when they were prescribed what seemed to be an unnecessarily large number of medications. Some believed that the fee-for-service system motivated providers to act against the patient’s interest by encouraging unnecessary prescriptions. Participants also described an inability to make appointments with doctors in China, which prevented continuity of care with any one physician. Instead, those who had returned to the same health facility several times generally reported seeing a different doctor each time. For some, this meant that they were unable to develop a relationship of trust with a physician over time. Those participants who reported that the lack of physician continuity affected their trust in the physicians contrasted this lack of continuity to their experiences in their countries of origin. One participant explained that he trusted his doctor at home because he grew up receiving care from him. He then explained that there was one doctor in China whom he had seen more than once, and he felt that the care he received improved the more he saw that doctor. Responding to this gap in the system, some participants proactively sought to establish a long-term relationship with a physician with whom they had a positive initial experience. Often this meant learning the physician’s work schedule and only seeking care on days when they were on duty. Since there was no way to formally schedule appointments through the hospital administration, at the end of each visit one participant informally scheduled each subsequent visit directly with her obstetrician. Four participants said they requested the physician’s phone number so that they could call or text ahead of time to make sure the physician would be available or to request informal referrals to other types of specialists if needed.Socio-cultural levelThe broader socio-cultural context in which Africans and Chinese interacted also shaped participants’.

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