S– layered minerals, inorganic hydrates and organic molecular solids–and with the

S– layered minerals, inorganic hydrates and organic molecular solids–and with the development of electron microscopy as an indispensable chemical technique. From the 1980s onwards, he has designed, characterized (in situ) and discovered numerous new solid catalysts. His research has earned him many awards: the Willard Gibbs, Pauling and Zewail Gold Medals from the USA, the Kapitza and Semenov medals from the Russian Academy, the Natta Gold Medal from the Italian Chemical Society, the Davy Medal from the Royal Society, the Faraday Medal (and six others) from the Royal Society of Chemistry and the Blaise Pascal Medal for Materials Science, 2014, from the European Academy of Sciences. For his contributions to geochemistry, a new mineral, meurigite, was named in his honour. He was knighted for services to chemistry and the popularization of science. His interest in Davy and his lamp was aroused at an early age: his brother (12 years his senior) worked underground for 50 years and his father for 30 years in the coal mines of southwest Wales.
2.Archeology of medical practiceThe whole health-care industry is pivoted on patients’ confidence that physicians possess a body of knowledge and skills which will culminate in the relief of their distress. Towards this end they repose not only trust and faith, invest in time and money but also hold their physicians in a certain esteem reserved for a very few individuals. On the other hand, this task of healing implicitly and/or explicitly imposes a moral stake on the physician. In other words medical professions exists because society believes that her health needs are to be met in a certain respect and therefore her willingness to grant a professional power and privilege in exchange for a commitment to serve selflessly.The word “Profession” is derived from original Latin profiteor, the meaning of which is self-explanatory. Indeed, during the period of Renaissance and early modern era even Medical Profession was crowded with self-trained Barber-Surgeons, apothecaries, midwives, drug peddlers, and charlatans. Over a period of time, however, three changes occurred. First, its practioners took upto science in a big way; focusing on a systematic analysis of patients’ symptoms in diagnosis, observation, experimentation and documentation. Second, the practioners of this profession publically made a strong and inseparable moral commitment that TGR-1202 msds though medical practice may be a source of their living; they will strive to the utmostE-mail address: [email protected] http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ihj.2015.02.013 0019-4832/Copyright ?2015, Cardiological Society of India. All LM22A-4 biological activity rights reserved.i n d i a n h e a r t j o u r n a l 6 7 ( 2 0 1 5 ) 1 efor the benefit of the patient and not be driven by mere desire for material wealth or personal aggrandizement. Finally, moving beyond the scope and confines of the law of the land, they agreed to a process of self-regulation (Hippocratic Oath, and later formation of Medical Councils). This way health field evolved from the Guild of Barbers and Surgeons to a Society of Medical Professionals (Doctors), different from any other profession and clearly distinguished from mere traders. Understandably, this process also led to separation of Medical Practioners from Chemists (who in turn evolved from the apothecaries and formed a `lower’ class of doctors; less educated and less skilled) who sold drugs directly to the patients. Ever since (time of this “Social Contract”) the.S– layered minerals, inorganic hydrates and organic molecular solids–and with the development of electron microscopy as an indispensable chemical technique. From the 1980s onwards, he has designed, characterized (in situ) and discovered numerous new solid catalysts. His research has earned him many awards: the Willard Gibbs, Pauling and Zewail Gold Medals from the USA, the Kapitza and Semenov medals from the Russian Academy, the Natta Gold Medal from the Italian Chemical Society, the Davy Medal from the Royal Society, the Faraday Medal (and six others) from the Royal Society of Chemistry and the Blaise Pascal Medal for Materials Science, 2014, from the European Academy of Sciences. For his contributions to geochemistry, a new mineral, meurigite, was named in his honour. He was knighted for services to chemistry and the popularization of science. His interest in Davy and his lamp was aroused at an early age: his brother (12 years his senior) worked underground for 50 years and his father for 30 years in the coal mines of southwest Wales.
2.Archeology of medical practiceThe whole health-care industry is pivoted on patients’ confidence that physicians possess a body of knowledge and skills which will culminate in the relief of their distress. Towards this end they repose not only trust and faith, invest in time and money but also hold their physicians in a certain esteem reserved for a very few individuals. On the other hand, this task of healing implicitly and/or explicitly imposes a moral stake on the physician. In other words medical professions exists because society believes that her health needs are to be met in a certain respect and therefore her willingness to grant a professional power and privilege in exchange for a commitment to serve selflessly.The word “Profession” is derived from original Latin profiteor, the meaning of which is self-explanatory. Indeed, during the period of Renaissance and early modern era even Medical Profession was crowded with self-trained Barber-Surgeons, apothecaries, midwives, drug peddlers, and charlatans. Over a period of time, however, three changes occurred. First, its practioners took upto science in a big way; focusing on a systematic analysis of patients’ symptoms in diagnosis, observation, experimentation and documentation. Second, the practioners of this profession publically made a strong and inseparable moral commitment that though medical practice may be a source of their living; they will strive to the utmostE-mail address: [email protected] http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ihj.2015.02.013 0019-4832/Copyright ?2015, Cardiological Society of India. All rights reserved.i n d i a n h e a r t j o u r n a l 6 7 ( 2 0 1 5 ) 1 efor the benefit of the patient and not be driven by mere desire for material wealth or personal aggrandizement. Finally, moving beyond the scope and confines of the law of the land, they agreed to a process of self-regulation (Hippocratic Oath, and later formation of Medical Councils). This way health field evolved from the Guild of Barbers and Surgeons to a Society of Medical Professionals (Doctors), different from any other profession and clearly distinguished from mere traders. Understandably, this process also led to separation of Medical Practioners from Chemists (who in turn evolved from the apothecaries and formed a `lower’ class of doctors; less educated and less skilled) who sold drugs directly to the patients. Ever since (time of this “Social Contract”) the.

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