Iewees: a unique number following a character indicating type of interview

Iewees: a unique number following a character indicating type of interview (video [V], audio [A]).298 ?2014 Macmillan Nectrolide web Publishers Ltd. 1477-8211 Social Theory Health Vol. 12, 3, 291?Aesthetic rationality of the popular expressive artsAnalysis proceeded by thematizing the data. When saturation was reached, themes were compared for congruency determining similarities and overlaps (Lincoln and Guba, 1985). The emerging themes were then refined, assigned interpretative meanings and grouped in conceptual categories. The interviews uncovered the inherent potential of the expressive arts to (1) expedite undistorted lifeworld communication, (2) facilitate the participants’ critical reflection and (3) consolidate their experiential knowledge.FindingsThe group of women in this study shares some, but not all, features of a new social movement (Scambler, 2001). The group did not engage in conspicuous public protest and the project’s resulting ethnodrama was not a coordinated form of subversion against system goals. However, the production did challenge medical discourse concerning diagnoses of, and treatments for, lymphedema and provided a platform for the participants to speak the truthfulness of the `patient voice’ to the expert culture of medicine. Akin to the new social movements, communicative rationality underpinned the social learning of the group of study participants. Their unspoken assertions embedded in their art forms expedited the exchange and scrutiny of validity claims and facilitated the exploration of alternative understandings of the lymphedema condition. The group’s exploration of the meaning of illness, disease and disability was a catalyst for critical self-reflection. The solidarities arising from the group came from matters of personal and collective identities and not from class relations, a further parallel to the new social movements. Moreover, by addressing issues pertaining to their daily lives shaped by lymphedema, the group reinforced the legitimacy of patients’ lay knowledge and moderated the effects of the strategic rationality of the medical professionals. The thematic characteristics of the group ?undistorted communication, critical reflection and consolidated lay knowledge ?will be explored in detail in the subsequent sections. Expediting undistorted lifeworld communication through popular expressive art forms In the study’s workshops, the expressive art forms were used as a point of departure for aesthetically communicative experiences among the women. Inspired by Habermasian thought, the workshop’s creative activities were introduced by the researchers as tools for individual and collective critical reflection, not for display in the City’s art gallery. The workshops were organized to optimize the simultaneously occurring processes involved in aesthetic experiences: (1) the?2014 Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 1477-8211 Social Theory Health Vol. 12, 3, 291?12Quinlan et aldynamic integration of expressions of the art piece with their implicit cognitive and normative understandings; (2) subjective reactions in reference to specific objective MS023 web properties; (3) and a critical, corrective `synthesis’ of subjective confrontation and objective commentary (Seel, 1985, as cited in Ingram, 1991). The women were asked not to `overthink’ the production of their collages, but to let their intuition drive the impulse of their choices of images, or words in the case of free-writing. In addition, the parameters we placed on the proc.Iewees: a unique number following a character indicating type of interview (video [V], audio [A]).298 ?2014 Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 1477-8211 Social Theory Health Vol. 12, 3, 291?Aesthetic rationality of the popular expressive artsAnalysis proceeded by thematizing the data. When saturation was reached, themes were compared for congruency determining similarities and overlaps (Lincoln and Guba, 1985). The emerging themes were then refined, assigned interpretative meanings and grouped in conceptual categories. The interviews uncovered the inherent potential of the expressive arts to (1) expedite undistorted lifeworld communication, (2) facilitate the participants’ critical reflection and (3) consolidate their experiential knowledge.FindingsThe group of women in this study shares some, but not all, features of a new social movement (Scambler, 2001). The group did not engage in conspicuous public protest and the project’s resulting ethnodrama was not a coordinated form of subversion against system goals. However, the production did challenge medical discourse concerning diagnoses of, and treatments for, lymphedema and provided a platform for the participants to speak the truthfulness of the `patient voice’ to the expert culture of medicine. Akin to the new social movements, communicative rationality underpinned the social learning of the group of study participants. Their unspoken assertions embedded in their art forms expedited the exchange and scrutiny of validity claims and facilitated the exploration of alternative understandings of the lymphedema condition. The group’s exploration of the meaning of illness, disease and disability was a catalyst for critical self-reflection. The solidarities arising from the group came from matters of personal and collective identities and not from class relations, a further parallel to the new social movements. Moreover, by addressing issues pertaining to their daily lives shaped by lymphedema, the group reinforced the legitimacy of patients’ lay knowledge and moderated the effects of the strategic rationality of the medical professionals. The thematic characteristics of the group ?undistorted communication, critical reflection and consolidated lay knowledge ?will be explored in detail in the subsequent sections. Expediting undistorted lifeworld communication through popular expressive art forms In the study’s workshops, the expressive art forms were used as a point of departure for aesthetically communicative experiences among the women. Inspired by Habermasian thought, the workshop’s creative activities were introduced by the researchers as tools for individual and collective critical reflection, not for display in the City’s art gallery. The workshops were organized to optimize the simultaneously occurring processes involved in aesthetic experiences: (1) the?2014 Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 1477-8211 Social Theory Health Vol. 12, 3, 291?12Quinlan et aldynamic integration of expressions of the art piece with their implicit cognitive and normative understandings; (2) subjective reactions in reference to specific objective properties; (3) and a critical, corrective `synthesis’ of subjective confrontation and objective commentary (Seel, 1985, as cited in Ingram, 1991). The women were asked not to `overthink’ the production of their collages, but to let their intuition drive the impulse of their choices of images, or words in the case of free-writing. In addition, the parameters we placed on the proc.

Leave a Reply