Weighted more heavily than observations with a smaller number of data

Weighted more heavily than observations with a smaller number of data points. The second approach is called multiple imputation, and the growth model is estimated in a two-stage sequence (Rubin, 1987; Schafer, 1999). In the first stage, the missing data points are imputed based upon the characteristics of the non-missing data points, and this is done multiple times (typically 5 to 10 times). In the second stage, the growth model is fitted separately to each of the imputed data sets, and the results are pooled into a final set of estimates. Although extremely flexible, both approaches invoke explicit assumptions about the nature of missing data. Specifically, the missing data must be characterized as missing completely at random (e.g., cases are truly missing at random) or missing at random (e.g., cases are missing as a function of measured characteristics such as gender or ethnicity). Importantly, data that are missing not at random (e.g., cases are missing as a direct function of unmeasured characteristics such as the very value that is missing) cannot be included in standard growth modeling applications, and much more NIK333MedChemExpress NIK333 complex procedures are required (e.g., Heckman, 1976; Rubin, 1988).WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT SHAPES OF GROWTH CURVES THAT CAN BE MODELED?A critically important first step in any growth model is the identification of the optimal functional form of the trajectory over time; that is, it must be established exactly how the repeated measures change as a function of time. If the incorrect functional form is used as the basis for the initial growth model, then expanding this model to include complexities such as predictors of growth or multiple group analysis will likely lead to biased results. TheJ Cogn Dev. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2011 July 7.Curran et al.Pagemost basic form of growth is a random intercept-only model; this implies that there is a stable Thonzonium (bromide) msds overall level of the repeatedly measured construct over time and individuals vary randomly around this overall level at any given time point. It may seem an oxymoron to call an intercept-only model “growth,” but this is consistent with the notion of a trajectory that is simply flat with respect to time. This intercept-only model can then be expanded in a variety of directions. The most straightforward method is to consider the family of polynomial functions; examples include a straight line, a quadratic curve, and a cubic curve. Polynomials are widely used given that these can be easily estimated within either the SEM or multilevel frameworks. Other more complex functional forms are possible including entire families of interesting exponential trajectories (e.g., monomolecular, logistic; Cudeck Harring, 2007). However, a variety of complications arise when incorporating these types of trajectories, because the parameters enter the model nonlinearly, making model estimation substantially more difficult, if not at times impossible. A flexible alternative is to use piecewise linear modeling to approximate complex nonlinear functions in which two or more linear trajectories are joined together to correspond to a potentially intractable nonlinear function (Bollen Curran, 2006, pp. 103?06; Raudenbush Bryk, 2002, pp. 178?79; Singer Willett, 2003, pp. 207?08). A final option is a fully latent curve model available within the SEM framework in which some or all of the loadings on the slope factor are freely estimated so that change optimally corresponds to the unique c.Weighted more heavily than observations with a smaller number of data points. The second approach is called multiple imputation, and the growth model is estimated in a two-stage sequence (Rubin, 1987; Schafer, 1999). In the first stage, the missing data points are imputed based upon the characteristics of the non-missing data points, and this is done multiple times (typically 5 to 10 times). In the second stage, the growth model is fitted separately to each of the imputed data sets, and the results are pooled into a final set of estimates. Although extremely flexible, both approaches invoke explicit assumptions about the nature of missing data. Specifically, the missing data must be characterized as missing completely at random (e.g., cases are truly missing at random) or missing at random (e.g., cases are missing as a function of measured characteristics such as gender or ethnicity). Importantly, data that are missing not at random (e.g., cases are missing as a direct function of unmeasured characteristics such as the very value that is missing) cannot be included in standard growth modeling applications, and much more complex procedures are required (e.g., Heckman, 1976; Rubin, 1988).WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT SHAPES OF GROWTH CURVES THAT CAN BE MODELED?A critically important first step in any growth model is the identification of the optimal functional form of the trajectory over time; that is, it must be established exactly how the repeated measures change as a function of time. If the incorrect functional form is used as the basis for the initial growth model, then expanding this model to include complexities such as predictors of growth or multiple group analysis will likely lead to biased results. TheJ Cogn Dev. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2011 July 7.Curran et al.Pagemost basic form of growth is a random intercept-only model; this implies that there is a stable overall level of the repeatedly measured construct over time and individuals vary randomly around this overall level at any given time point. It may seem an oxymoron to call an intercept-only model “growth,” but this is consistent with the notion of a trajectory that is simply flat with respect to time. This intercept-only model can then be expanded in a variety of directions. The most straightforward method is to consider the family of polynomial functions; examples include a straight line, a quadratic curve, and a cubic curve. Polynomials are widely used given that these can be easily estimated within either the SEM or multilevel frameworks. Other more complex functional forms are possible including entire families of interesting exponential trajectories (e.g., monomolecular, logistic; Cudeck Harring, 2007). However, a variety of complications arise when incorporating these types of trajectories, because the parameters enter the model nonlinearly, making model estimation substantially more difficult, if not at times impossible. A flexible alternative is to use piecewise linear modeling to approximate complex nonlinear functions in which two or more linear trajectories are joined together to correspond to a potentially intractable nonlinear function (Bollen Curran, 2006, pp. 103?06; Raudenbush Bryk, 2002, pp. 178?79; Singer Willett, 2003, pp. 207?08). A final option is a fully latent curve model available within the SEM framework in which some or all of the loadings on the slope factor are freely estimated so that change optimally corresponds to the unique c.

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