S relating to commercial sex. In a safe environment, the dialogue

S relating to commercial sex. In a safe environment, the purchase ML240 dialogue usually happened in such a natural and friendly sisterhood way, that it dispelled women’s fear of seeing a doctor for STIs, and made the sex topics easier to talk about. They would also chat about the new changes of the sex industry, through which information would be collected on where new FSW were appearing, whether there was drug use in the venue, which venue was cracked down, etc. We also observed that calls came in quite often to consult for health issues, especially about pregnancy and abortion, or asking for help to refer to other hospitals if the service is out of the range of this clinic. (Field notes, end of 1st week, January 2012) These supportive clinical services, which incorporated respect, concern and relationship building, were essential parts of JZ’s success in working with FSW and surpass the services that would typically be provided to a patient (FSW or order Procyanidin B1 otherwise) in a standard clinical setting. Supportive services were especially important for attracting FSWs who were hard to reach through traditional outreach work, such as street-standing FSWs and women who were very mobile. For example, many migrant FSWs now come to the centre to get tested before returning to their hometowns for holidays. As noted by one FSW: I’ve known Dr Z for 4? years; she is a good and skilled person, we believe in her. ?I have a child and husband at home and I’ll visit them soon ?very exciting ?I usually go home once or twice a year and definitely don’t want to transmit to my family some disease, you know, in this business, it is hard to tell ?I don’t feel like I have a problem, but just to double check, to be safe and feel more comfortable. (FSW, in early 40s) A welcoming clinic setting and high-quality clinical services were both essential elements of JZ’s success; neither component alone would be as successful at attracting and maintaining FSW’s engagement with the programme services. Responsive outreach work with FSW–Outreach work consisted of on-site training to FSW about STI and HIV knowledge and strategies of how to avoid violence from clients and police, distribution of IEC materials, on-site health consultations and collection of blood for STI tests, visitation of incarcerated FSW and additional supportive activities. JZ’s regular outreach work happens at least three times a week. The outreach activities are conducted by pairs of workers (either one peer leader trained FSW and one CBO worker or two CBO workers if no peer leaders are available) and generally involve walking the neighbourhoods to visit sex work venues one by one. For remote areas, staff take a taxi or bus, or sometimes used their own cars. All staff and management participated in outreach work. This comprehensive participation familiarised staff with the local FSWs’ work situations ?including venue organisation types ?which in turn benefited their intervention work. Outreach services covered different types of sex work venues from streets to large karaoke bars. The sites and content of the outreach services vary depending on the occupational issues arising during the current time period, JZ’s relationship with the venues and the business situation of each site. As outreach coordinator Miss Chen described:Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptGlob Public Health. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 August 01.Huang et al.PageYou can’t expect people to warmly welcome yo.S relating to commercial sex. In a safe environment, the dialogue usually happened in such a natural and friendly sisterhood way, that it dispelled women’s fear of seeing a doctor for STIs, and made the sex topics easier to talk about. They would also chat about the new changes of the sex industry, through which information would be collected on where new FSW were appearing, whether there was drug use in the venue, which venue was cracked down, etc. We also observed that calls came in quite often to consult for health issues, especially about pregnancy and abortion, or asking for help to refer to other hospitals if the service is out of the range of this clinic. (Field notes, end of 1st week, January 2012) These supportive clinical services, which incorporated respect, concern and relationship building, were essential parts of JZ’s success in working with FSW and surpass the services that would typically be provided to a patient (FSW or otherwise) in a standard clinical setting. Supportive services were especially important for attracting FSWs who were hard to reach through traditional outreach work, such as street-standing FSWs and women who were very mobile. For example, many migrant FSWs now come to the centre to get tested before returning to their hometowns for holidays. As noted by one FSW: I’ve known Dr Z for 4? years; she is a good and skilled person, we believe in her. ?I have a child and husband at home and I’ll visit them soon ?very exciting ?I usually go home once or twice a year and definitely don’t want to transmit to my family some disease, you know, in this business, it is hard to tell ?I don’t feel like I have a problem, but just to double check, to be safe and feel more comfortable. (FSW, in early 40s) A welcoming clinic setting and high-quality clinical services were both essential elements of JZ’s success; neither component alone would be as successful at attracting and maintaining FSW’s engagement with the programme services. Responsive outreach work with FSW–Outreach work consisted of on-site training to FSW about STI and HIV knowledge and strategies of how to avoid violence from clients and police, distribution of IEC materials, on-site health consultations and collection of blood for STI tests, visitation of incarcerated FSW and additional supportive activities. JZ’s regular outreach work happens at least three times a week. The outreach activities are conducted by pairs of workers (either one peer leader trained FSW and one CBO worker or two CBO workers if no peer leaders are available) and generally involve walking the neighbourhoods to visit sex work venues one by one. For remote areas, staff take a taxi or bus, or sometimes used their own cars. All staff and management participated in outreach work. This comprehensive participation familiarised staff with the local FSWs’ work situations ?including venue organisation types ?which in turn benefited their intervention work. Outreach services covered different types of sex work venues from streets to large karaoke bars. The sites and content of the outreach services vary depending on the occupational issues arising during the current time period, JZ’s relationship with the venues and the business situation of each site. As outreach coordinator Miss Chen described:Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptGlob Public Health. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 August 01.Huang et al.PageYou can’t expect people to warmly welcome yo.

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