Er infiltrate (OI), normal or uninterpretable [22]. These readings were compared and

Er infiltrate (OI), normal or uninterpretable [22]. These readings were compared and x-rays with conflicting results were read by a third clinician and the majority diagnosis used. Where there was no agreement between any of the three readers, the CXR was deemed uninterpretable.Methods Study SiteThe study was conducted in Maela, a camp for displaced persons located 5 km east of the Myanmar (Burma) border in Northwest Thailand. Maela is a densely populated camp with approximately 45,000 people living in 10,000 houses in an area of 4 km2. The CY5-SE web population in the camp is young, with half being under 18years of age. Health care in the camp is provided predominately by the nongovernmental organisation Premiere Urgence-Aide Medicale ?Internationale (PU-AMI), though the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit (SMRU) has been providing medical and obstetric care for this population since 1986 and was responsible for providing the medical care for all study participants. The SMRU clinic in Maela is run by local refugee staff under the supervision of two expatriate doctors. The majority of the staff have no formal medical training but are trained “on the ground” by the expatriate doctors from SMRU. In preparation for this study, locally appropriate guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of common childhood illnesses were developed based on the IMCI. These guidelines and examination skills were taught to the medical staff. Examination skills focussed on the recognition of the sick infant and child, taking vital signs (in particular respiratory rate) and chest auscultation. Throughout the study period inter-observer variability 1480666 in respiratory rate assessment was checked. Briefly, three supervisors were nominated and, individually, the respiratory rates of ten children were counted at the same time as the study paediatrician and were compared. A mean difference of less than one breath per minute (BPM) was observed. Subsequently, all staff who were responsible for taking the vital signs of the study children were assessed at several time points throughout the study to ensure accuracy.ClimateThe climate at Maela is tropical, with temperatures ranging from 15uC?5uC and the monsoon occurring from May to October. Seasons were defined as hot (March ?May), wet (June ?October) and cool (November ?February). Meteorological data was obtained from the Thai government weather reporting station at Mae Sot, a town close to Maela.Study DesignWe followed a cohort of 965 infants from birth until two years of life. Starting in 2007, women GDC-0917 following antenatal care at the SMRU clinic were enrolled at 28?0 weeks gestation over a oneData Management and Statistical MethodsData were double entered into Access 2003 databases (Microsoft) and systematically checked 15857111 for errors. All analyses were performed using Stata/IC 12.1 (StataCorp). Continuous variablesRespiratory Syncytial Virus Associated Pneumoniawere described by the median and inter-quartile range (IQR); comparisons between groups were made using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Incidence rates were analysed using Poisson regression and groups compared by incidence rate ratios (IRR). For univariate analyses two by two tables were constructed and association tested by the chi-squared test. Odds ratios were calculated using logistic regression. Those factors with a significant p-value (,0.05) were included in a multivariate logistic regression model.Clinical DiseaseThe most common diagnosis in a child with RSV-associated pneumonia.Er infiltrate (OI), normal or uninterpretable [22]. These readings were compared and x-rays with conflicting results were read by a third clinician and the majority diagnosis used. Where there was no agreement between any of the three readers, the CXR was deemed uninterpretable.Methods Study SiteThe study was conducted in Maela, a camp for displaced persons located 5 km east of the Myanmar (Burma) border in Northwest Thailand. Maela is a densely populated camp with approximately 45,000 people living in 10,000 houses in an area of 4 km2. The population in the camp is young, with half being under 18years of age. Health care in the camp is provided predominately by the nongovernmental organisation Premiere Urgence-Aide Medicale ?Internationale (PU-AMI), though the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit (SMRU) has been providing medical and obstetric care for this population since 1986 and was responsible for providing the medical care for all study participants. The SMRU clinic in Maela is run by local refugee staff under the supervision of two expatriate doctors. The majority of the staff have no formal medical training but are trained “on the ground” by the expatriate doctors from SMRU. In preparation for this study, locally appropriate guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of common childhood illnesses were developed based on the IMCI. These guidelines and examination skills were taught to the medical staff. Examination skills focussed on the recognition of the sick infant and child, taking vital signs (in particular respiratory rate) and chest auscultation. Throughout the study period inter-observer variability 1480666 in respiratory rate assessment was checked. Briefly, three supervisors were nominated and, individually, the respiratory rates of ten children were counted at the same time as the study paediatrician and were compared. A mean difference of less than one breath per minute (BPM) was observed. Subsequently, all staff who were responsible for taking the vital signs of the study children were assessed at several time points throughout the study to ensure accuracy.ClimateThe climate at Maela is tropical, with temperatures ranging from 15uC?5uC and the monsoon occurring from May to October. Seasons were defined as hot (March ?May), wet (June ?October) and cool (November ?February). Meteorological data was obtained from the Thai government weather reporting station at Mae Sot, a town close to Maela.Study DesignWe followed a cohort of 965 infants from birth until two years of life. Starting in 2007, women following antenatal care at the SMRU clinic were enrolled at 28?0 weeks gestation over a oneData Management and Statistical MethodsData were double entered into Access 2003 databases (Microsoft) and systematically checked 15857111 for errors. All analyses were performed using Stata/IC 12.1 (StataCorp). Continuous variablesRespiratory Syncytial Virus Associated Pneumoniawere described by the median and inter-quartile range (IQR); comparisons between groups were made using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Incidence rates were analysed using Poisson regression and groups compared by incidence rate ratios (IRR). For univariate analyses two by two tables were constructed and association tested by the chi-squared test. Odds ratios were calculated using logistic regression. Those factors with a significant p-value (,0.05) were included in a multivariate logistic regression model.Clinical DiseaseThe most common diagnosis in a child with RSV-associated pneumonia.

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