Proved the relationships between Chinese patients and physicians [54?6]. Lastly, implementing a

Proved the relationships between Chinese patients and physicians [54?6]. Lastly, implementing a primary care model that allows patients the opportunity to develop a long-term relationship with a physician could be important. This model is already being piloted at sites in Shenzhen, Beijing, and Shanghai [53,57,58]. Expanding this model to Guangzhou in conjunction with interpreter services and outreach to SP600125MedChemExpress SP600125 African community leaders might help to promote trust in physicians among African migrants. The African migrant population in Guangzhou is diverse, and it is difficult to generate findings that are generalizable for this population. We sought to capture this diversity in our study through purposive sampling. Due to the sensitivity of the topic, we did not specifically ask participants about their visa status, and discussion of visas and SP600125 structure immigration concerns arose infrequently in our interviews. Two participants, however, mentioned that they did not have valid visas. Migrants without current documentation may have been less likely to participate in our study, a challenge that other researchers studying the African population in Guangzhou have reported [22]. Additionally, we did not recruit African migrants from Francophone or Lusophone countries who were unable to speak English. These are likely to be some of the most marginalized migrants, and research on their health care experiences in China is needed. As China pursues ongoing national health reform [59], the experience of African migrant patients needs to be considered when designing interventions to improve the quality of patient-physician relationships. Additional research and pilot studies are needed to better understand the potential for measures such as professional interpreter services, payment reform, and primary care models to improve African migrants’ trust in Chinese physicians.Supporting InformationS1 Table. Demographic characteristics of African migrants interviewed. (PDF)PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0123255 May 12,10 /African Migrant Patients’ Trust in Chinese PhysiciansS2 Table. Quotes supporting study themes. (PDF)AcknowledgmentsWe thank Margaret Lee for her comments on a previous version of this manuscript. We also thank Yu Cheng, Xiang Zou, Jiazhi Zeng, and Yong Xu for their contributions to the research.Author ContributionsConceived and designed the experiments: MMM LL JDT. Performed the experiments: MMM LS XZ. Analyzed the data: MMM LS XZ LL JDT. Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: JDT. Wrote the paper: MMM LS XZ LL JDT.
ResourceMultiomic Analysis of the UV-Induced DNA Damage ResponseGraphical Abstract AuthorsStefan Boeing, Laura Williamson, Vesela Encheva, …, Michael Howell, Ambrosius P. Snijders, Jesper Q. [email protected] BriefBoeing et al. investigate the UV-induced DNA damage response by combining a range of proteomic and genomic screens. A function in this response for the melanoma driver STK19 as well as a number of other factors are uncovered.HighlightsdA multiomic screening approach examines the UV-induced DNA damage response Multiple factors are connected to the transcription-related DNA damage response Melanoma gene STK19 is required for a normal DNA damage responseddBoeing et al., 2016, Cell Reports 15, 1597?610 May 17, 2016 ?2016 The Author(s) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2016.04.Cell ReportsResourceMultiomic Analysis of the UV-Induced DNA Damage ResponseStefan Boeing,1,5 Laura Williamson,1.Proved the relationships between Chinese patients and physicians [54?6]. Lastly, implementing a primary care model that allows patients the opportunity to develop a long-term relationship with a physician could be important. This model is already being piloted at sites in Shenzhen, Beijing, and Shanghai [53,57,58]. Expanding this model to Guangzhou in conjunction with interpreter services and outreach to African community leaders might help to promote trust in physicians among African migrants. The African migrant population in Guangzhou is diverse, and it is difficult to generate findings that are generalizable for this population. We sought to capture this diversity in our study through purposive sampling. Due to the sensitivity of the topic, we did not specifically ask participants about their visa status, and discussion of visas and immigration concerns arose infrequently in our interviews. Two participants, however, mentioned that they did not have valid visas. Migrants without current documentation may have been less likely to participate in our study, a challenge that other researchers studying the African population in Guangzhou have reported [22]. Additionally, we did not recruit African migrants from Francophone or Lusophone countries who were unable to speak English. These are likely to be some of the most marginalized migrants, and research on their health care experiences in China is needed. As China pursues ongoing national health reform [59], the experience of African migrant patients needs to be considered when designing interventions to improve the quality of patient-physician relationships. Additional research and pilot studies are needed to better understand the potential for measures such as professional interpreter services, payment reform, and primary care models to improve African migrants’ trust in Chinese physicians.Supporting InformationS1 Table. Demographic characteristics of African migrants interviewed. (PDF)PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0123255 May 12,10 /African Migrant Patients’ Trust in Chinese PhysiciansS2 Table. Quotes supporting study themes. (PDF)AcknowledgmentsWe thank Margaret Lee for her comments on a previous version of this manuscript. We also thank Yu Cheng, Xiang Zou, Jiazhi Zeng, and Yong Xu for their contributions to the research.Author ContributionsConceived and designed the experiments: MMM LL JDT. Performed the experiments: MMM LS XZ. Analyzed the data: MMM LS XZ LL JDT. Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: JDT. Wrote the paper: MMM LS XZ LL JDT.
ResourceMultiomic Analysis of the UV-Induced DNA Damage ResponseGraphical Abstract AuthorsStefan Boeing, Laura Williamson, Vesela Encheva, …, Michael Howell, Ambrosius P. Snijders, Jesper Q. [email protected] BriefBoeing et al. investigate the UV-induced DNA damage response by combining a range of proteomic and genomic screens. A function in this response for the melanoma driver STK19 as well as a number of other factors are uncovered.HighlightsdA multiomic screening approach examines the UV-induced DNA damage response Multiple factors are connected to the transcription-related DNA damage response Melanoma gene STK19 is required for a normal DNA damage responseddBoeing et al., 2016, Cell Reports 15, 1597?610 May 17, 2016 ?2016 The Author(s) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2016.04.Cell ReportsResourceMultiomic Analysis of the UV-Induced DNA Damage ResponseStefan Boeing,1,5 Laura Williamson,1.

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