Ions resulting mainly from familial or social conflicts and did not

Ions resulting mainly from familial or social conflicts and did not have a notion of the biopsychological facts. Thus, the Turkish patient group rarely considered professional treatment (e.g., psychotherapy, psychotropic drugs, psycho-education) as a valuable tool for recovery. Instead, the source for recovery was seen in the regaining of social harmony within the family and social environment. Not surprisingly, it has been reported that Turkish immigrant women in Amsterdam consulted social work facilities and women’s crisis intervention centers nearly 1.5 times more than mental health care services (116). As Kirmayer and Sartorius (117) also noted, these results suggest that those patients are not only seeking mitigation of symptoms but also individually and socially meaningful explanations and psychosocial treatments for their illness.mentioned positive AG-221 mechanism of action consequences of expressive suppression in Turkish women were owing to their additional use of cognitive reappraisal. This finding can lead to the conclusion that what relates to a poor mental health is not the presence of suppression per se, but rather the absence of cognitive reappraisal or the rigid and exclusive use of suppression. Hence, rather than discouraging suppression, promoting a more flexible use of emotion regulation strategies (e.g., additional use of adaptive emotion regulation strategies) in psychotherapy seems more fitting for the needs of this patient group. Therapists AKB-6548MedChemExpress Vadadustat should be aware that Turkish patients might benefit from expressive suppression to avoid social or familial conflicts-which are frequently reported as causes of their mental distress. As already mentioned, most Turkish patients conceptualize depression as a social problem or an emotional reaction to situations resulting from a disruption in social/familial relationships. Unlike patients with Western origins, they did not have a notion of biopsychological causes. Therefore, instead of professional treatment, these patients’ suggestions for management and health-seeking emphasized self-management and social support. This highlights the importance of psychosocial treatment for this particular clientele. As noted before, without ameliorating familial or social conflicts, working mainly on personal conflicts or using medication alone would probably fail to achieve the desired treatment outcomes. Accordingly, given these patients’ group and family orientations, acknowledgement and inclusion of family members in the psychotherapy process (e.g., assessment and therapeutic goals/decisions) might bring better outcomes. For instance, there is some evidence that such biopsychosocial holistic approaches work quite successfully with patients from collectivistic non-Western cultures (e.g., Egypt) (123). A similar recommendation also came from some practitioners working with Turkish patients in Germany. Erim and Mustard (124) highlighted the importance of extending classical Western individualistic treatment approaches with collectivist principles. This could be, for instance, on the one hand working with interpersonal conflicts and the involvement of family members in the therapy; on the other hand, encouraging patients’ individuation and social relationships (e.g., through participation in regular activities in clubs or language courses) to promote their integration and, hence, their mental health. Despite the higher prevalence rates of mental disorders among Turkish patients, the literature points to low service uti.Ions resulting mainly from familial or social conflicts and did not have a notion of the biopsychological facts. Thus, the Turkish patient group rarely considered professional treatment (e.g., psychotherapy, psychotropic drugs, psycho-education) as a valuable tool for recovery. Instead, the source for recovery was seen in the regaining of social harmony within the family and social environment. Not surprisingly, it has been reported that Turkish immigrant women in Amsterdam consulted social work facilities and women’s crisis intervention centers nearly 1.5 times more than mental health care services (116). As Kirmayer and Sartorius (117) also noted, these results suggest that those patients are not only seeking mitigation of symptoms but also individually and socially meaningful explanations and psychosocial treatments for their illness.mentioned positive consequences of expressive suppression in Turkish women were owing to their additional use of cognitive reappraisal. This finding can lead to the conclusion that what relates to a poor mental health is not the presence of suppression per se, but rather the absence of cognitive reappraisal or the rigid and exclusive use of suppression. Hence, rather than discouraging suppression, promoting a more flexible use of emotion regulation strategies (e.g., additional use of adaptive emotion regulation strategies) in psychotherapy seems more fitting for the needs of this patient group. Therapists should be aware that Turkish patients might benefit from expressive suppression to avoid social or familial conflicts-which are frequently reported as causes of their mental distress. As already mentioned, most Turkish patients conceptualize depression as a social problem or an emotional reaction to situations resulting from a disruption in social/familial relationships. Unlike patients with Western origins, they did not have a notion of biopsychological causes. Therefore, instead of professional treatment, these patients’ suggestions for management and health-seeking emphasized self-management and social support. This highlights the importance of psychosocial treatment for this particular clientele. As noted before, without ameliorating familial or social conflicts, working mainly on personal conflicts or using medication alone would probably fail to achieve the desired treatment outcomes. Accordingly, given these patients’ group and family orientations, acknowledgement and inclusion of family members in the psychotherapy process (e.g., assessment and therapeutic goals/decisions) might bring better outcomes. For instance, there is some evidence that such biopsychosocial holistic approaches work quite successfully with patients from collectivistic non-Western cultures (e.g., Egypt) (123). A similar recommendation also came from some practitioners working with Turkish patients in Germany. Erim and Mustard (124) highlighted the importance of extending classical Western individualistic treatment approaches with collectivist principles. This could be, for instance, on the one hand working with interpersonal conflicts and the involvement of family members in the therapy; on the other hand, encouraging patients’ individuation and social relationships (e.g., through participation in regular activities in clubs or language courses) to promote their integration and, hence, their mental health. Despite the higher prevalence rates of mental disorders among Turkish patients, the literature points to low service uti.

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